Looks like I have an interest in Polish films about nuns. Mother Joan of the Angels (1961) is a creepy drama, focusing on the sociological and psychological phenomenon of mass hysteria and its interpretation within a religious context as demonic possession. Directed by¬†Jerzy Kawalerowicz and based on the supposedly true event of the Loudun possessions, […]

To kick off my film reviewing in 2017, I present to you two (very) short films – one focusing on the sociological phenomenon of the Circle Game, and another, a Christmas special directed by Wes Anderson for Swedish fashion chain H&M. Both are slightly similar in their creative aspects, and both are great shorts. Onwards! […]

Another year has come and gone, and with this new year of 2017 comes a new opportunity to watch films that I should have watched already but haven’t for some reason. This is the exact purpose of the Blindspot series, which I’ve been doing for two years so far – it’s an opportunity to identify […]

Happy 2017 everybody! Like I mentioned in my recent December favourites post, 2016 has been pretty crappy for lots of reasons. I’m not going to make a list (because I kind of already did in my December post), but I think everyone could identify at least five terrible things that happened. As a result, I […]

Happy new year everyone! Welcome to 2017! I think we can all agree that 2016 was a pretty rough year for many and varied reasons: the loss of many many, talented people; one of the hugest cluster-shits in political history occurred and continues to occur; Harambe; numerous terrorist attacks; a movie about emojis. But this […]

The Sacrifice, released in May 1986, was Andrei Tarkovsky’s final film before his death in December 1986. In consideration of its typical Tarkovskian (did I make that word up?) themes of mortality, lost humanity, and wonderings about religion and man’s place in the world, the film is a very interesting piece of work indeed. Its […]

Roman Polanski’s The Pianist (2002) is a true story of survival, and is often included in lists of the best films about the Holocaust. Winner of the Palme d’Or at Cannes, the film was also nominated for seven Academy Awards, eventually winning three: Best Director, Best Actor, and Best Adapted Screenplay. Its synopsis is as […]

Frederico Fellini’s Roma (1972) is the kind of film that makes you want to travel to the magnificent city of Rome immediately and just sit and people-watch. Both a criticism and a celebration of Rome and its people, Roma‘s synopsis is as follows: A fluid, unconnected and sometimes chaotic procession of scenes detailing the various […]

Famed Monty Python¬†troupe member Terry Gilliam’s Brazil (1985) is a maelstrom of bureaucratic bungles, illustrated in his classic quirky style. Its synopsis is as follows: Bureaucracy and ductwork run amok in the story of a paperwork mixup that leads to the imprisonment of Mr. Buttle, shoe repairman, instead of Harry Tuttle, illegal freelance Heating Engineer. […]

I don’t normally write about the deaths of important people here at Film Grimoire (with one other exception). But Carrie Fisher, who passed away today at the age of 60, was an exceptional woman. As a young girl growing up in the early 90s, at the time it felt like I had heaps of great […]